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Block7 : Een andere manier van zijn: "Verander je leven" Rilke

Talk: A Life Without Technology
Zuiderkerk, Zaterdag 1 juni, 2019
13:15-14:15 h
Mark Boyle (confirmed)
Q&A met de publiek
Zuiderkerk, Zaterdag 1 juni, 2019
14:15-14:30 h
(confirmed)
Talk: Not Working: Why We Have to Stop
Zuiderkerk, Zaterdag 1 juni, 2019
14:30-15:30 h
Josh Cohen (confirmed)
Q&A met de publiek
Zuiderkerk, Zaterdag 1 juni, 2019
15:30-16:00 h
Josh Cohen (confirmed)

Not Working is not a manifesto for the downing of tools or a mass walkout, nor is it an overtly political book — an author interested in that particular angle could surely fill page after page about the apathetic populace in the modern age. But it is a persuasive call for a re-evaluation of how we live our lives and the things we find value in. Cohen usefully grounds the more theoretical wrangling of each chapter with a composite case history gleaned from his consulting room. This is then followed by a famous example to illustrate each of his character types: the Pop artist Andy Warhol (burnout), the actor and director Orson Welles (slob), the poet Emily Dickinson (daydreamer) and the writer David Foster Wallace (slacker), figures we’re no doubt familiar with, but about whose lives Cohen proffers new insight.

Dickinson’s reclusiveness, for example, which he analyses not as a response to disappointment or dissatisfaction, but rather “a bid for radical personal and literary independence and imaginative freedom”.

Not Working not only instructs us in the pursuit of aimlessness, it also teaches us about the psychoanalytic process. Analysis, for example, is often accused of being a therapeutic practice that wastes time, “talk for the mere sake of it”. Cohen admits that although this opinion isn’t without some truth — he’s not so entrenched in his discipline he can’t acknowledge its flaws, which is refreshing — it still fundamentally misses the point. In one way or another a patient comes to psychoanalysis “to be relieved of the pressure to produce, to formulate a solution, to get somewhere,” he explains. “It offers the experience . . . of discovering the layer of pure being buried under the surface of daily doing.” Less doing and more being is exactly what Not Working is advocating.





Mark Boyle